Kernel exploit for iOS 11.2-11.2.1 surfaces

Security researcher Ian Beer made headlines last year after finding and releasing a tfp0 exploit for iOS 11.0-11.1.2, which powers jailbreak tools like Electra and LiberiOS, just to name a few. But now there’s a new kernel exploit in town, and it impacts later iterations of iOS.

Citing Apple’s security content web page, Tuesday’s iOS 11.2.5 update patches a kernel-level exploit discovered by security researcher Russ Cox, and it purportedly works on iOS 11.2-11.2.1…. Read the rest of this post here



Kernel exploit for iOS 11.2-11.2.1 surfaces” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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How to allow guests to connect to your Wi-Fi network with a QR code

QR code for Wi-Fi network access

We recently shared a quick and easy way to share access to your Wi-Fi network without revealing the password using a new feature available in iOS 11. As noted by iDB reader websyndicate in the comments of that post, another way to share access to your Wi-Fi network without exchanging any network name or password is to use a QR code…. Read the rest of this post here



How to allow guests to connect to your Wi-Fi network with a QR code” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Israeli class action suit over Meltdown & Spectre targets Apple, ARM and Intel

In spite of assurances from Intel that software fixes for the recently publicized vulnerabilities in CPU designs would not result in substantial performance penalty, Apple has nevertheless found itself in the middle of a legal brouhaha over Meltdown and Spectre over in Israel…. Read the rest of this post here



Israeli class action suit over Meltdown & Spectre targets Apple, ARM and Intel” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Apple is sorry for the critical root vulnerability: “our customers deserve better”

Less than 24 hours after developer Lemi Orhan Ergin‏ discovered a critical bug in macOS High Sierra that made it far too easy for anyone to gain root access to your Mac, Apple has responded by issuing a fix while apologizing for the concern it has caused to customers…. Read the rest of this post here



Apple is sorry for the critical root vulnerability: “our customers deserve better”” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Apple releases macOS High Sierra update fixing root password vulnerability

Apple on Wednesday issued a critical patch for macOS High Sierra to fix a major vulnerability discovered yesterday which allowed unrestricted access with full administrative privileges on Macs with a Guest account enabled or the root account’s password left blank…. Read the rest of this post here



Apple releases macOS High Sierra update fixing root password vulnerability” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Dangerous macOS High Sierra bug allows full admin access, here is how to protect your Mac

A potentially serious bug has been discovered by developer Lemi Orhan Ergin‏ that allows anyone to gain root access to your machine by attempting to login with the username “root” and leaving the password blank. The vulnerability can easily be replicated, but fortunately, there is a simple workaround to fix the problem on your Mac until Apple releases a patch…. Read the rest of this post here



Dangerous macOS High Sierra bug allows full admin access, here is how to protect your Mac” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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SSHIcon lets you know when there are active SSH connections to your device

SSH is a powerful tool that lets you access your jailbroken handset’s filesystem on the fly, but one of the things I don’t like about it is how there’s no indication when an SSH connection is initiated.

A new free jailbreak tweak called SSHIcon by iOS developer Sticktron solves this problem by putting an icon in your Status Bar any time you or someone else uses SSH to access your device…. Read the rest of this post here



SSHIcon lets you know when there are active SSH connections to your device” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Musubi brings an Android-style passcode screen to jailbroken iOS 9 devices

iOS has had the same boring numeric passcode interface for what seems like an eternity, but other operating systems like Android let users ‘draw’ patterns to unlock their device instead.

Although most people are using Touch ID to unlock their Apple devices today, jailbreakers can now use a new free jailbreak tweak dubbed Musubi by iOS developer c0ldra1n to bring an Android-inspired pattern passcode interface to iPhones and iPads…. Read the rest of this post here



Musubi brings an Android-style passcode screen to jailbroken iOS 9 devices” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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How to check if the phone you’re buying was stolen

If you’re in the market for a used iPhone, it’s always a good idea to ask the owner to disable Find My iPhone, which automatically turns off Apple’s theft-deterring Activation Lock feature.

But what if you’re buying a non-Apple smartphone? Can you still check if it was stolen? As it turns out, that’s exactly what CTIA’s Stolen Phone Checker service does for you.

Powered by the GSMA Device Check service, which provides up to 10 years’ of a device’s history as well as the device model information and capabilities, the free Stolen Phone Checker tool is an online service designed to help consumers, businesses and law enforcement agencies make informed purchasing decisions and limit the resale of lost and stolen mobile devices.

TUTORIAL: How to find your iPhone’s IMEI number

This is a US-only service so this tutorial may not apply to international readers.

How to check if the phone you’re buying was stolen

1) Visit stolenphonechecker.org/spc/consumer on your device.

2) Enter the IMEI, MEID or ESN of the phone you’re about to purchase. If you’re buying an iPhone, you can find this information in Settings → General → About. If you’re buying a non-Apple smartphone, ask the owner to provide the IMEI number.

3) Solve the captcha and click the Submit button.

If the phone isn’t stolen,“Not reported lost or stolen” should appear next to Device Status along with some useful information, including the device model, manufacturer and more.

Regular consumers are allowed to check up to find phones per day. Again, this service is limited solely to consumers in the United States.

Related tutorials

Check out the following how-tos:

Wrapping it up

If you have a question, post a comment below and we’ll do our best to answer it. Please share this tutorial on social media and pass it along to the folks you support.

Submit your ideas regarding future coverage via [email protected]



How to check if the phone you’re buying was stolen” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Apple offering up to $200K for vulnerabilities in new bug bounty program

iPhone 6 space gray Touch ID

Apple on Thursday launched a new bug bounty program, in which it will pay researchers cash for discovering vulnerabilities in its products. The announcement was made at the annual Black Hat security conference by Apple’s head of security engineering Ivan Krstic.

Several major technology companies, such as Microsoft and Google, have long offered similar programs, but Apple has remained a holdout until now. The iPhone-maker will pay anywhere between $25K and $200K for exploits, depending on where it is and what it does…. Read the rest of this post here



Apple offering up to $200K for vulnerabilities in new bug bounty program” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Source: iDownloadBlog